Welcome To The Hiring Tips!

Hello and thank you for stopping by. I’m Stan Dubin, the Executive Director of The Employee Testing Center.

Our employee testing service has been helping companies make better hiring decisions for over ten years now. Whether you use our service or not, I decided a running collection of “Hiring Tips” would be helpful.

These tips address the full scope of hiring: employee motivation, skills, pay, testing, and evaluation. There are tips on what to ask, what not to ask and how to avoid dangerous hiring mistakes. There are 20 plus tips on hiring and the law that our readers have found very helpful.

Most of the tips now also include a podcast version. If you’d prefer to listen on your smart phone, iPod, etc., subscribe via iTunes.

All in all, we want you hiring better staff.

Enjoy!



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Fanatical Should You Be About Hiring The Right People?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

I’ve written over 150 hiring tips and almost all of them offer advice on “how to” hire someone.

This tip will be a bit different. It will focus more on your viewpoint of hiring.

I realize I’ll be preaching to the choir with many of you, but, well, I enjoy a little preaching here and there.

First, let me read a few quotes from a few CEOs.

From Howard Schultz, CEO of Starbucks,

“We employ 200,000 people. So I can make the case – and I have for years – that the most important discipline at Starbucks is human resources.”

Kevin Ryan, CEO of Double-Click, a Google subsidiary, realized this about hiring:

“I used to think business was 50 percent having the right people. Now I think it’s 80 percent. The best way to be productive is to have a great team. So I spend more time than most CEOs on human resources.” 

This next one is from Lee Iaccoca, famous for steering Chrysler Automotive away from bankruptcy and into record profits:

“I hire people brighter than me and then I get out of their way!”

And last but not least, the late Steve Jobs had this view of the importance of hiring:

“I have participated in the hiring of maybe 5,000-plus people in my life. So I take it very seriously.”

Now I understand these quotes are from CEOs of large companies and a good number of you run much smaller businesses.

But, on any scale, just how important is hiring the right person?

I’m thinking 99 out of a 100 of you will say, “It’s very important.”

But for many of us, it’s also a juggling match.

How much time do we spend trying to find the right person juggled with filling the position that needs filling and hoping for the right person the next time.

I know from speaking to many business owners, that part of that thought process includes:

“Is the right person really out there?”

So a fair (or even a large) amount of compromise occurs.

I understand. It’s not easy. And it can be frustrating to cast a net out there and what comes back is not what you really need and want.

So, what to do?

Well, you’re certainly familiar with the following slogans:

– You’ve got to have the right attitude.

– If you have the right frame of mind, anything’s possible.

– Success comes to those who believe.

And there are many others like those.

Now, I’m not here to give you airy-fairy advice, but I do believe if you have a fairly strong conviction to hire the right person AND that that individual IS out there, you have a much better chance of making that happen.

If your conviction along this line has taken a number of “hits” and you’ve accumulated too many losses on wanting, but not getting the right person, then I have this advice for you:

Change your mind.

That’s the one thing ALL of us are extremely capable of doing.

Change your mind.

In a completely new and fresh unit of time, put the correct emphasis on hiring the right person and develop a clean viewpoint that this person IS out there and IS eager to be a part of your team.

As my Jewish mom used to say — when offering chicken soup as the cure for just about anything — “Well, it couldn’t hurt.”

…and, when it comes to hiring, it just might help.

So, feel free to change your mind and determine the right people are out there for you.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Have Them Turn The Tables On You

hiring interview

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

In many cases, anywhere from 90 to 100% of the hiring interview focuses on asking the applicant questions.

The good interviewers will allow the applicant to ask a few questions as well.

But what if we turned the tables here and insisted the applicant ask a lot of questions.

“Robert, I’ve asked you a number of questions here and I appreciate your answers. Now, I’d like you to ask me three questions. Anything you like.”

Or you could make that five questions you want from the applicant.

I realize it’s a bit of an arbitrary number — three or five or really any other number — but the idea here is to get Robert to ask away. And giving him a specified number of questions should help.

Why are we making this request — or some might say, this demand — on Robert?

Well, what Robert asks could be very revealing.

It could tell us how much homework Robert did on your company. Did he do a superficial study or did he really dig in?

It could tell us how willing Robert is to be candid right up front. If he asks about the contents of your vending machine, that’s not quite the same as asking if you feel your company is fulfilling its purpose in the community.

Robert’s questions might also tell you how long Robert envisions being a part of your company.

One of the key reasons, if not the key reason, for the hiring interview is to gain real insights into your applicant.

How many times have you interviewed someone and felt you had a good grasp on how they were going to work out…and then a short time down the road, this person was no longer with you?

Well, asking your applicant to turn the tables on you could be one good way of gaining these important insights.

Let’s just give the applicant a nice push to ask away.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Would They Handle An Irate Customer?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

This is a great question for those applying for a position that involves regular contact with customers.

But instead of having your applicant simply answer it, why not see how they would actually handle it.

There’s nothing like a live exercise to find out how skilled someone is, right?

So, let’s set the scene:

“Sarah, you’re going to be the store manager in this live exercise. I’ll be Mary, a very upset customer who has just come over to you demanding her money back. She’s loud and you can see she’s having an effect on the other customers in the store.”

And then do your best to give a realistic display of what this irate customer might say and see how Sarah responds.

I understand each store may have their own refund policy, and if you want to briefly describe yours to Sarah to make this exercise more realistic, that’s not a bad idea.

Observing how Sarah would apply a store policy would be helpful, but the main thing you want to see in action are Sarah’s “people skills.” How does Sarah defuse this irate customer so that the other customers aren’t negatively affected AND so that Sarah feels she’s being genuinely attended to.

You could do several versions of this. I would suggest starting off by making it fairly easy for Sarah and then make tougher each time. Maybe you start crying at the end and see how Sarah deals with that.

Just suggestions, folks. The purpose here is to observe your applicant in action and handling what is likely one of the more difficult situations he or she will encounter.

You might learn more about Sarah in 10-15 minutes of this kind of live exercise than you might in hours long interviews without the live exercise.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Does A Company Owe Its Employees?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

I’m reading an excellent eBook entitled “From Q&A to Z, the Hiring Manager’s Complete Interviewing Guide.” Inside are a number of excellent hiring tips.

You might ask, why would I promote a competitor’s product here?

Well, it’s a big world, and I imagine my company’s clients and prospective clients can benefit from quality information from more than one source.

Here’s the link to this eBook. When I tried the link just now, it wasn’t working, but I believe that’s a temporary issue. If you’re not able to access the eBook from the link, send me a message here and I’ll forward you the eBook directly.

From this eBook, I noticed an intriguing question you could ask your applicants:

“What does a company owe its employees?”

The answers you get are likely to be all over the spectrum.

Some may say they expect a great deal from the company and you may get a long list of specific items the applicant believes they are owed.

Others may tell you the company simply owes them a proper monetary exchange and that the APPLICANT wants to perform at a high level and demonstrate their value to the company before additional exchange is considered.

Between those two views will be a variety of responses.

And I’m sure your personal view of what your company “owes” your employees will influence how you interpret the responses you get.

All things considered, your applicant’s answers will tell you a great deal about their future expectations with you.

Then of course it comes down to whether you feel you can meet those expectations.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Long Do You Plan On Sticking Around?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

That’s an interesting question to ask an applicant and a simple wording would be:

“Sarah, if we hired you, how long do you plan on sticking around?”

Sarah’s answer should deliver an insight into her potential longevity with you.

If her answer doesn’t give you a good sense of commitment, that’s worth knowing ahead of time.

But that also begs the question, being asked more and more these days:

How long should a new employee commit to the company?

One could answer that question philosophically, or one could simply find out directly from the applicant.

And the interesting flip side to the question “how long do you plan on sticking around” is:

“Sarah, under what circumstances would you leave?”

Again, a fairly direct question.

If Sarah’s answer touches on things that were done “to her” at her previous jobs, that’s not the height of responsibility.

But she may also mention not feeling “sufficiently challenged” or she may be candid and project another job offer that she couldn’t turn down.

When you ask these two questions:

How long do you plan on sticking around?

and

Under what circumstances would you leave?

You could cut through some of the potentially canned (or prepared) responses and gain some good insights into your applicant.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...