Welcome To The Hiring Tips!

Hello and thank you for stopping by. I’m Stan Dubin, the Executive Director of The Employee Testing Center.

Our employee testing service has been helping companies make better hiring decisions for over ten years now. Whether you use our service or not, I decided a running collection of “Hiring Tips” would be helpful.

These tips address the full scope of hiring: employee motivation, skills, pay, testing, and evaluation. There are tips on what to ask, what not to ask and how to avoid dangerous hiring mistakes. There are 20 plus tips on hiring and the law that our readers have found very helpful.

Most of the tips now also include a podcast version. If you’d prefer to listen on your smart phone, iPod, etc., subscribe via iTunes.

All in all, we want you hiring better staff.

Enjoy!



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Ask Him To “Make the Rounds”

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

By now, you know our motto:

“The more you know about someone before you hire them, the better your hiring decision will be.”

With that in mind, here’s a tip that may gain you a good bit of information in a fairly short period of time.

At some point in the hiring interview, look at your applicant and say, “Okay, Alex, the next thing I’d like to do is have you meet our staff. Feel free to walk around and say hi to everyone. Ask them what they do, if you like, or even ask if they like working here. I’ll let you head off and do that and I’ll meet you back here in a half an hour.”

Word that in any way that you like with the idea that you want Alex to meet all (or quite a few at least) of your staff and have a brief conversation with them.

You’re likely to get considerable feedback here. Your staff will let you know how comfortable he was, how communicative he was, if he asked any interesting questions, etc.

Ideally you’d set this up with your staff ahead of time. If they know that you’ll be sending new applicants around every so often, they’ll be ready and likely most willing to participate.

You could also have a short form printed off for your staff to report back to you their observations. Or you could have them send you a fast email after they’ve seen Alex.

You should gain some valuable insights from Alex directly when he returns to the interview. Feel free to ask very specific questions here:

“What did you think of our staff?”

“Did you find anyone particularly interesting?”

“Did Robert in accounting give you a hard time? He loves harassing prospective employees.”

Alex may come back from this tour of your staff with a big smile on his face and he may come back looking quite glum. Or anywhere in between.

This short tour may give you some keen insights into your applicant that you might not get in any other way.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


The Really Bright Guy Who Ruins Your Company

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Well, it happens.

The candidate has all the skills. He’s top of his class. He aces all of the competency tests.

He can run circles around your best technician, your best salesperson, your most skilled programmer.

He’s just downright brilliant.

Except for one thing.

He’s a complete jerk.

You’ve managed to find out from several of his previous employers that he was rough on management and even rougher on his fellow employees. They wouldn’t come out and quite tell you this, but you sensed they hated the guy.

Now, I realize that may be a stretch, because many employers won’t necessarily give those kinds of reports on previous employees. But some will.

And maybe you checked around a bit, spoke to employees who worked with him and found out he was indeed the brightest star in the galaxy, but he was hell to be around.

And you’re thinking, “Hmm, maybe it’ll be different here.”

Or: “I’m a strong leader, I can manage this guy. His skills are so off the charts, we need him!”

Look, I’m not going to discount anybody’s ability to manage. I’ve seen really bad apples in the sports world go from Team A to Team B and the coach at Team B AND the other players on Team B were able to bring this bad apple around.

It happens.

But what happens more often is the bad apple, no matter how competent, goes from Team A to Team B to Team C and infects each and every one of those teams.

So, as always, it’s up to you. But if you’ve got a loaded gun to my head and you want my most honest advice here, hiring someone who refuses to get along with others is a huge risk. No matter how capable he is.

He may bring all kinds of great skills to your company while shredding the willingness of those around him. You may not be happy with the net effect.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Toxic and Non Toxic Hires

I saw this infographic today and just about everything on it looked helpful to the subject of hiring.

qualities-of-a-non-toxic-employee



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


When All Else Fails…

perplexed business owner

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

I read a quote today from Kevin Ryan, the CEO of Double-Click, a successful online company:

“I used to think business was 50 percent having the right people. Now I think it’s 80 percent. The best way to be productive is to have a great team. So I spend more time than most CEOs on human resources.”

Kevin is making a point that many CEOs and business owners overlook in today’s hectic and competitive business word.

Getting THE RIGHT PEOPLE into the key positions in your company may very well accomplish more for your bottom line than any other single action.

Yes, you need to consider marketing, sales, accounting, legal. You need customer service and you need to deliver a good enough product or service so that customers return and ideally refer others to you.

I realize I’m preaching to the choir here. You wouldn’t be reading this tip if you weren’t interested in improving the quality of your hires.

But I do have a purpose in mind here.

How do you really view hiring for your company?

Is it (just) one of those necessary parts of doing business?

Or is it an absolutely vital component to achieving your business goals.

Is it something you give adequate time and attention to?

Or do you have a burning desire to find the right people and you’ll do whatever it takes to locate them?

We’ve all had wins and losses when it comes to hiring. Sometimes those losses accumulate and cause us to be less committed to finding the right people.

We may go through the motions. We may ask all of the right questions in the interview. We may use testing to further determine their capabilities.

In the end, though, when you’ve got the right people, isn’t life in the fast lane SO MUCH easier?

Well, no need to answer that out loud. Of course, you could click here to send me a fast reply on Twitter.

Okay, let’s wrap this up. This tip was written to remind you of what’s at stake when a position needs to be filled.

So, when all else fails, gather up every ounce of resolve you’ve got and get the right person.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What If The Applicant Has Personal Issues?

Sad Applicant

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

This can be a touchy subject for some. On both sides of the table.

The applicant comes in and admits to having a personal problem. It could be someone whose child is doing very poorly in school and has spent more time with the disciplinarian than in the class room. Or the person is grieving at the loss of a loved one.

There are a number of possibilities here, but I think you get the idea.

So, what to do?

Do you automatically disqualify someone because they brought their problems into the job interview? It’s not very professional, right?

Well, to put it bluntly, it’s not. But let’s look at some other possibilities here.

What if this is a rare instance of the person wearing their emotions on their sleeve, and you’ve got a really great potential contributor in front of you?

[Side note: My partner told me that not everyone would know what it means to “wear your emotions on your sleeve” so it means to show your emotions openly.]

Let’s go a step further and let’s speculate that this person freely discusses their personal problems, and yet, they could also be a real asset to your company.

Well, before you rule out this candidate, I’d consider listening for a bit to see if the person just needed a few minutes to get their attention freed up. They may pop out of it and you’re off to the next steps of the interview.

If your candidate is qualified in many ways, has a strong (and verifiable) résumé, and you believe is an overall good fit for your company, you may want to overlook a personal problem coming up during the interview.

Sometimes the stresses of life can become so great that a person feels compelled to share a bit of that with the person in front of them. Even in a hiring interview.

Before you claim I’m being too much of a “softie” let me offer this: to a considerable degree, I write these hiring tips to give you perspective.

The more able you are in weighing the pluses and minuses of the person in front of you, the better your hiring decisions will be.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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