Welcome To The Hiring Tips!

Hello and thank you for stopping by. I’m Stan Dubin, the Executive Director of The Employee Testing Center.

Our employee testing service has been helping companies make better hiring decisions for over ten years now. Whether you use our service or not, I decided a running collection of “Hiring Tips” would be helpful.

These tips address the full scope of hiring: employee motivation, skills, pay, testing, and evaluation. There are tips on what to ask, what not to ask and how to avoid dangerous hiring mistakes. There are 20 plus tips on hiring and the law that our readers have found very helpful.

Most of the tips now also include a podcast version. If you’d prefer to listen on your smart phone, iPod, etc., subscribe via iTunes.

All in all, we want you hiring better staff.

Enjoy!



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Let’s See What You Can Do!

Hiring Show and Tell
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This tip is similar to an earlier one, but I wanted to give it a different spin here.

Let’s give your applicant a very specific assignment and have him carry it out as part of the hiring interview.

A few examples:

Have a customer service candidate review how customers are handled from pre-sale all the way through to fulfillment and follow-up and have the candidate write up how this could be improved.

If someone is applying for the collections position, do a bit of role playing. Have the candidate go down the list and attempt to collect the amounts from you.

Sales is another great position for role playing. Describe a few different selling scenarios and have the candidate take you from start to finish of the sales process.

For some of these, you could even include a time element, say 30 or 60 minutes.

A smiling candidate with a well-rounded résumé is a good start. A candidate who performs right in front of you will take you considerably closer to hiring the right person.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Much Homework Are They Willing To Do?

Homework

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Before someone comes in for an interview, let’s see how much “homework” they’re willing to do.

The first thing would be to is ask them to look over your company’s web site.

If your company sells a product, ask the person to come to the interview with some ideas on how to sell the product. Whether you’re hiring for a sales position or not, you simply want to know if they’re willing to dig in a little at your web site and show a bit of creativity.

If your company provides a service, you could ask the applicant to look over your site and suggest a couple of ways the service could be improved.

I heard of an author who was looking for someone to market her book, so she asked applicants to come to the interview with their ideas on how her book could be better marketed.

You could even ask your applicants to look over your company’s web site and make a couple of suggestions on how the web site itself could be improved.

Regardless of the position you need filling, asking your applicants to do a bit of homework is a great way to see them in action and to see how much they care about their first contact with you.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Always Be Hiring

Always Hiring

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I discussed this in an earlier tip, but it’s worth another look.

Do you ever meet people that you think would be a great fit for your company?

If that happens, what do you do?

Well, no need to answer that last question because I have a great suggestion. And it’s very simple.

Keep a record of that person.

I am a big fan of the program Evernote. It’s a free service that lets you keep all kinds of records. You can write notes in a record. You can record an audio note in a record. You can save web pages in Evernote. You can save selections of a web page. You can save images, videos, etc.

It is a very capable program. And, as I said it’s free. They do have a paid version, but that’s only needed if you’re saving a huge number of records every month.

There is a Windows version, a Mac version and an App for the various smart phones and tablets.

You’d think this tip was a big commercial for Evernote, but let me get back to the subject of the tip.

Whenever you meet someone or hear of someone that you think might be a good asset for your company, make a record.

Include as much information as possible: name, phone, location, email address and any social media outlets they use: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc.

In addition to the above, record any observations you may have. If you heard about this person from someone else, indicate who that was and what their observations were.

When the day comes, you can return to these records and you may find someone you considered a pearl six months ago who is willing to come by and interview with you.

Another time to “always be hiring” are the times when you actually are hiring. That isn’t a play on words, I do have something in mind here. And it may be a bit arduous, but I’ll put it out there for you to consider.

Let’s say you’re hiring for position X and, after going through your hiring process with a number of people, you find and hire your ideal candidate.

That’s that, right?

Well, here’s the suggestion: interview the remaining candidates.

Establish a good relationship with each one in the hiring interview(s) and keep a record of each one for future positions.

Yes, that’s considerably more work, but I wanted to provide the suggestion as a way to build up your pool of future resources.

Well, there you have it. If you’re “always hiring” and keeping decent records of potential employees for down the road, you’ll likely find this makes hiring easier and easier as time goes along.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Does The Word Accountable Mean To Them?

Who Is Accountable?

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Accountable. Now that indeed is an interesting word.

I found two good definitions:

1) responsible for the effects of your actions and willing to explain them

2) responsible to someone or for some action; answerable

It almost seems the two words, responsible and accountable, are interchangeable. But not quite.

The main difference between responsibility and accountability is that responsibility can be shared while accountability cannot. Being accountable not only means being responsible for something but also ultimately being answerable for your actions.

So let’s ask your applicant what the word means.

“Frank, what is your definition of the word accountable?”

Now I’m going to give you a heavy dose of my opinion here. If Frank can easily communicate a fairly complete definition, this is a good sign that he demonstrates the quality.

If Frank fumbles around for an answer, then this could be a weak area for him.

The key here is that Frank can easily talk to you about accountability. It’s not foreign to him. He has familiarity with it.

So, instead of asking directly about being accountable, ask them to define the word. This may give you a better clue as to just how accountable they are.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Did They Improve the Workplace Around Them?

Staff Helping Out

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This is a simple question and one that can yield excellent information for you.

The answers you get are important, but the speed of the answer can also be revealing.

If you ask Sue, “In your previous jobs, how did you improve the workplace around you?” and it takes her awhile to answer, I see two possibilities:

1) She hasn’t really done this very often, if at all

or

2) She may have accomplished this so often, she just kind of considered it “routine.”

So, you may need to “groove in” the question some.

You: “Sue, in your previous jobs, how did you improve the workplace around you?”

Sue: “Well, let’s see. Hmm. I imagine I’ve done this before.”

You: “Well, your résumé says you handled collections in your last two jobs. What would be an example of improving the workplace from that position?”

Sue: “Oh, I see. Well, in both companies I was able to streamline the collections process with several insurance companies. And I also figured out a payment plan that patients were willing to use, and it resulted in getting them fully paid 2-3 months sooner than before.”

You: “That’s great, Sue. Any others like that?”

After she gives you what she can, you might say, “That’s great, Sue. Any instances of improving the workplace around you in terms of your fellow employees?”

Give Sue a bit of time to look that over and she may very well have some good data for you there.

Of course, if you’ve grooved the question in and Sue just doesn’t have an answer, then that’s what you’ve got.

The ability and willingness to improve life around one and specifically the workplace around one — this, in my humble opinion, is a great quality to look for.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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