Can You “Hear” Them Smile?

Phone Interview

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Before you sit down and interview an applicant in person, you (or one of your staff) speak to them over the phone, right?

What are you trying to determine at this point?

Besides a short interview which could end in an invitation to come and interview, there are some things you can discover by phone.

First and foremost, you are hoping they sound professional, right?

If music is blaring in the background, does he turn it down so the two of you can have a decent conversation?

And you’d like for them to be a bit prepared for your call. If they don’t recall what company you’re from even though you announced it at the beginning of the call, not a great sign.

How is your prospect’s manners? Does she let you complete your communication fully, or does she interrupt?

Is it a nice, smooth conversation from start to finish?

And last but not least, can you “hear” them smile?

I’m not making a mystical point here, folks. You know what I mean. Is the person bringing a bit of life to the conversation? And do YOU have a smile on your face at the end?

Pay attention to some of the above details in a phone conversation and your phone interviews will lead you to better prospects for the in-person interview.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What EXACTLY Does the Position Require?


Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

When we’re hiring for a specific position, whether it be an Office Manager, Collections Manager, Salesperson or Receptionist, we have a very good idea of what we’re looking for.

This tip is to take that “very good idea of what you’re looking for” and write down EXACTLY what you need.

For example, what exactly do you want a sales person to be and to be able to do. Again, I’m sure you have a very good idea of these things, but let’s list out some exact qualities.

You probably want your salespeople to be:

Persistent
Self starters
Very positive
Resourceful
Independent
Conscientious
Attentive to detail
Respectful
Friendly
Patient
Superb listeners
Passionate and compassionate
Excellent time managers
Able and willing to “pry”

So, that’s a pretty good list, right. And of course feel free to edit that list. Delete or add qualities as you see fit.

Now what do you do with this list of qualities you’ve put together for a given position?

You could look through the applicant’s résumé and see if any of these qualities are present.

When you speak to former employers, you could mention a few of the above qualities and ask to what degree were these present in his or her work.

And you could discuss each of these qualites directly with the applicant.

“Frank, I’m going to read off a few qualities that we consider vital for the position and I’d like you to tell me what each quality means to you, how you’ve applied them in the past and how you see yourself applying them here.”

And off you go. That should get you some good insights, right?

Build a very specific list of qualities for each of your key positions and keep them in a folder. When it’s time to hire for any of the positions, bring out the list and do your due diligence and do your best to hire someone who has most if not all of the qualities you want.

As I said, we all have a very good idea of what we’re looking for. Get a bit more organized on this point, a bit more exacting, and see if this produces a better quality hire.

I have a suspicion it will.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Do They Treat Other People?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

How will your prospective employee treat your customers and other staff?

Will they be friendly, helpful and appreciative?

Or will they be tactless, dispassionate and cynical?

And how can you tell ahead of time?

Well, one can test for personality traits. Our 200 question test will get you past the usual social responses and give you unexpected insights into your prospect’s personality.

So of course I recommend using our test.

But what else can you do?

You could take your applicant around the office or store and introduce him to a few of the staff. Let your staff know ahead of time that you might be doing this and ask them to take a minute or two and “engage” — ask a few questions, maybe even be a bit disarming.

One example might be an employee looking startled that the person is interested in a job there and asking, “Are you sure you want to work here? The boss is a decent chap, but the pay and perks aren’t so great.” Maybe this gets said within earshot of the boss, or maybe not.

A disarming question or two may reveal something about your applicant that you might not otherwise see.

While you’re walking around, observe how your applicant deals with each person they come into contact with, not just your staff. If you use the elevator, does he hold the door open for others; does he acknowledge the existence of the doorman; the receptionist?

Maybe you go out for a coffee — how does he treat the barista?

Whatever interaction you can observe, take it all in and evaluate.

And remember our motto:

The more you know about someone BEFORE you hire them, the better your hiring decision will be.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Have Them Turn The Tables On You

hiring interview

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

In many cases, anywhere from 90 to 100% of the hiring interview focuses on asking the applicant questions.

The good interviewers will allow the applicant to ask a few questions as well.

But what if we turned the tables here and insisted the applicant ask a lot of questions.

“Robert, I’ve asked you a number of questions here and I appreciate your answers. Now, I’d like you to ask me three questions. Anything you like.”

Or you could make that five questions you want from the applicant.

I realize it’s a bit of an arbitrary number — three or five or really any other number — but the idea here is to get Robert to ask away. And giving him a specified number of questions should help.

Why are we making this request — or some might say, this demand — on Robert?

Well, what Robert asks could be very revealing.

It could tell us how much homework Robert did on your company. Did he do a superficial study or did he really dig in?

It could tell us how willing Robert is to be candid right up front. If he asks about the contents of your vending machine, that’s not quite the same as asking if you feel your company is fulfilling its purpose in the community.

Robert’s questions might also tell you how long Robert envisions being a part of your company.

One of the key reasons, if not the key reason, for the hiring interview is to gain real insights into your applicant.

How many times have you interviewed someone and felt you had a good grasp on how they were going to work out…and then a short time down the road, this person was no longer with you?

Well, asking your applicant to turn the tables on you could be one good way of gaining these important insights.

Let’s just give the applicant a nice push to ask away.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Does A Company Owe Its Employees?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

I’m reading an excellent eBook entitled “From Q&A to Z, the Hiring Manager’s Complete Interviewing Guide.” Inside are a number of excellent hiring tips.

You might ask, why would I promote a competitor’s product here?

Well, it’s a big world, and I imagine my company’s clients and prospective clients can benefit from quality information from more than one source.

Here’s the link to this eBook. When I tried the link just now, it wasn’t working, but I believe that’s a temporary issue. If you’re not able to access the eBook from the link, send me a message here and I’ll forward you the eBook directly.

From this eBook, I noticed an intriguing question you could ask your applicants:

“What does a company owe its employees?”

The answers you get are likely to be all over the spectrum.

Some may say they expect a great deal from the company and you may get a long list of specific items the applicant believes they are owed.

Others may tell you the company simply owes them a proper monetary exchange and that the APPLICANT wants to perform at a high level and demonstrate their value to the company before additional exchange is considered.

Between those two views will be a variety of responses.

And I’m sure your personal view of what your company “owes” your employees will influence how you interpret the responses you get.

All things considered, your applicant’s answers will tell you a great deal about their future expectations with you.

Then of course it comes down to whether you feel you can meet those expectations.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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