How Appreciative Are They?

Appreciative employee

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here
1x
0:00
0:00

First, let’s look at two definitions of “appreciate” that apply to this tip:

To understand how good or useful someone or something is

Used to thank someone in a polite way or to say that you are grateful for something they have done

I’m thinking those two definitions blend in with each other. Someone who is appreciative understands how good or useful someone or something is and they communicate this in some way.

Ideally, you are looking for someone with a deep reservoir of appreciation, an appreciation of other people, the things other people do and even an appreciation for one’s environment.

We do enjoy the employee who sincerely thanks us for improving their work environment in some way.

“Bob, that new phone system you had installed is working really well. Thank you for doing that, Bob!”

“Thank you for creating the room where we can keep our lunch refrigerated and grab a snack during the day. Very helpful, Bob.”

“The Sunday picnic for the staff was off the charts. You really went out of your way to make that a great afternoon. My wife was blown away. Thank you, Bob.”

Now, if that appreciation extends to their fellow employees, that’s an even bigger plus.

Let’s find out if we’ve got that from your candidate.

“Alice, at your last job, tell me three things that you appreciated about the other employees you worked with.”

If Alice is the “appreciative sort” she should be able to tell you three things easily and quickly.

Going a bit further, you could ask, “Alice, how did you let these employees know that you appreciated them?”

When someone voices their appreciation of you and the things you do, you know how that makes you feel.

Well, the same is true of your employees. When someone who is openly appreciative of others, that has a very positive effect on the work place.

I’m not talking about an airy-fairy thing here. I’m not talking about someone who is nice to others because there’s something to be gained from being nice.

We know when we see genuine appreciation.

I rarely plug our employee tests in these tips, but I won’t be able to help myself here. Our personality profile measures ten key personality traits and one of them is appreciation. If you are not using our employee testing service, watch our two minute video and take the free test yourself.

In closing folks, there’s a huge difference between those who appreciate others and those who do not. It’s a fabulous trait to have on board.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Do We Owe You?

Benefits, Incentives, Bonuses, Extras, Perks and Advantages

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here
1x
0:00
0:00

I’m going to love this tip and I haven’t even written it yet!

For the most part, we’ve got two sides of the hiring equation, right? We’ve got the employer and we’ve got the person wanting to be employed.

There may be a middle man, e.g. a hiring agency, but at some point in time, you are going to be interviewing someone before you make any kind of long term hiring decision.

Back in the day — let’s say before the 80s or 90s — when you applied for a job, you were essentially told what the job was, what it paid, the hours, some idea of what was expected and, if that worked for you, then you were included for consideration.

Unless you were someone very special, you did not make demands or issue ultimatums to your prospective employer. If and when you did get hired, you were given a place to work, assigned tasks, maybe some training and off you went to carry out your duties.

After getting hired, you did not wait a week or two and then tell your employer that you need X, Y and Z so that you can perform to your full potential. AND that, if you didn’t get X, Y and Z, you might have to shop your talents elsewhere.

Back in the day, that just didn’t happen.

Now I realize I’m painting somewhat of a black and white picture here, but I’m doing it to make a point.

Let’s fast forward to present time.

The scenario I just presented is certainly not occurring wholesale in today’s hiring world, but some parts of this scenario are happening. And we can debate how much the balance of power has shifted in the hiring process and whether that’s good for business or not. But that’s not the purpose of this tip. This tip has a simple focus. We just want to find out from the applicant:

“As an employer, what do we owe you?”

When you ask this question, as we recommend with all questions in the hiring interview, pay close attention to how comfortable the applicant is in answering it. If he’s very comfortable, then it’s likely you’re getting a candid answer. If not, well, possibly not so candid.

Once your applicant has answered the question and you’ve written down what he said, it can’t hurt to ask it again:

“What else do we owe you?”

Now, I’m not recommending that you ask these questions — or any questions for that matter — with even a hint of a confrontational attitude. We just want to know what they feel the company owes them.

Their answers may fit 100% with what you’d like to provide every employee. That’s good to know.

And their answers may surprise or even shock you. That’s also good to know.

Either way, you’re likely to gain an insight into what it will be like having this person as part of your team.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Would You Let Your Son or Daughter Marry Your Applicant?

Proposal

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Okay, I realize this is a pretty stiff measurement to use with an applicant, but it is an interesting one.

You’ve read over his résumé, you’re verified as much of it as you possibly can, you’ve tested him on IQ, Aptitude and Personality, you’ve checked with previous employers and you’ve done several in-person interviews with him.

So, would you let him marry your daughter?

Your daughter’s not old enough to get married? Okay, you know what I’m talking about here.

How much do you trust this candidate?

Well, you can ask yourself in a variety of ways how much you trust someone, or you can simply ask yourself would you let him marry your daughter.

Would you approve of her marrying your son?

If your answer is yes, then that really tells you something about the candidate.

If the answer is no, then the next question is “how much of a ‘no’ is that?” If that’s an absolutely, without any shadow-of-a-doubt ‘no’ — well, then you haven’t a very high opinion of your candidate, do you?

Maybe you have a very high opinion of their skills, how polished they came across in the interview, their glowing résumé, but you wouldn’t let them near one of your kids.

Okay, I know this is a bit of an odd way of evaluating an applicant, but doesn’t it quickly give you an insight when you ask yourself this kind of question?

As with all of these wonderful hiring tips, use them as you see fit to help you learn more about people before you make that hiring decision.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Are We Really Looking For?

Socrates

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Yes, what are we really looking for: someone to get the work done for awhile or someone we can count on to be with us for years to come?

For the positions with routine turnover, this question is fairly easy to answer.

But what about the key positions?

Has the hiring culture changed so much that even the key positions are experiencing routine turnover?

I know we touched on this subject in a couple of earlier tips, but I’d like to give another perspective here if I could.

When it comes to long term commitment, what do we feel we have the right to look for and require?

If we travel back into the past some, qualities such as loyalty and allegiance were sought after and sometimes demanded.

Now, when I say “back into the past,” I’m not referring to medieval times with nobles and serfs.

For the greater part of the 20th century, when we hired for key positions, there was often an agreement between the employer and the prospective employee — whether openly stated or not — that important positions required a healthy commitment in time. The further back you went, the more the concept of allegiance played a role.

But here we are, well into the 21st century, and what can we expect? What can we require?

Has the hiring landscape changed so much that now every position is subject to routine turnover?

I think, for many of us, the answer is yes.

If we’re looking for commitment and even loyalty, we realize these qualities are earned, not just given.

That seems fair, right? The prospective employee is checking you out while you are checking out the prospective employee.

Let’s say you’re hiring for a key position and you’ve got a very qualified candidate in front of you. The résumé, the background checks, their test scores and the hiring interviews all look great. Before you make that decision, it might be worth your while to have one more conversation.

Have a conversation about commitment. Find out what that means to your candidate. Does it have any importance to them? And you should ask about it both ways. How important is it that their new company show commitment to them? And how important do they see their side of that coin?

It’s possible this conversation could influence your final decision.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


When In Doubt, Ask More Questions

Curious Interviewer

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Have you asked an applicant a question and the answer seemed pretty clear, but not 100% clear?

Here’s an example:

“Michael, where do you see yourself with our company in 12 months?”

“Well, for the most part, I see myself doing great work and ideally moving into more responsible positions.”

Okay, good answer, right?

Well, maybe so, but there could be more to it. Consider asking this follow up:

“Thanks, Michael. Could you tell me what you mean by ‘for the most part’?”

“Oh, well, I meant that I hoped I’d be around for at least 12 months.”

And you may want to clarify that answer with:

“When you say ‘you hoped you’d be around for at least 12 months’ — what does that “hope” depend on? Something on our end? Or something on your end?”

Back to his original answer, you’ve simply detected some uncertainty. Maybe a little lack of determination with how he views his future with you.

We understand every applicant has the right to shop their talents before they land a new job and we understand they can be looking elsewhere while they’re working for you.

We understand that.

Some of us consider employee loyalty a critical factor when hiring; others not so much. And the position plays a role here too. For some positions, you want to see real determination from the applicant that this is THE job for him and he’ll fight to get it and keep it.

Besides loyalty, there are of course other key qualities you’re looking for in the hiring interview.

When you ask an applicant an important question, don’t pass over an incomplete answer. Keep asking away, keep digging until you’re satisfied.

Six weeks later when the new employee didn’t pan out — for whatever reason — you don’t want to have that thought pop up: “Oh, darn, I remember in the interview not really getting a full answer to that key question. Well, I guess I just found out the answer.”

Find out ahead of time. Dig, clarify, ask more questions.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...