Video Interviews for Remote Applicants

remote interview

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

We have quite a few clients who interview applicants in other cities. The position is important enough that the client wants to expand the geographic area. The company may be based in Boston, Massachusetts with the applicant in Seattle, Washington.

Having the applicant fly in to be interviewed is a step that’s usually reserved for the end of the hiring process.

In the past, you would conduct as many phone interviews as possible; do a thorough verification of the person’s résumé; and get done any background checks deemed necessary.

With today’s technology, however, you can go one major step further. You can very easily conduct a video interview, regardless of your applicant’s location. As long as she has a fairly good connection to the Internet — and you as well — you have a variety of video tools available to you.

I particularly like join.me. The web site is easy to use and easy to understand. Within 1-2 minutes you and your applicant are in a video conference and it’s almost as if the person is across the table from you.

I recommend both of you using a computer — desktop or laptop equipped with a decent video camera — but either you or your applicant can also do this interview with an iPad or iPhone.

Feel free to ask any questions you feel will help you make that next decision: should this applicant fly — or drive — in to have a sit down interview with you?

The video interview will give you a great deal of data that you would not necessarily get from one or more phone interviews. Use it as often as you can when working with remote candidates.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Do They Like People?


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Now that seems a bit of an odd question, right? Doesn’t everyone pretty much like other people?

And just before you got that question out of your mouth, you knew the answer: not everybody does. We all know people who just don’t like other people. They rarely (or never) find a nice thing to say about others; they criticize easily and often; they grumble; and they are not all that warm and fuzzy to be around, right?

Well, those folks are obvious. They stick out like a sore thumb. This tip endeavors to go a bit deeper. Let’s take a look at this when it’s not so obvious and when you don’t have all the time in the world to find out.

Enjoying other people, having affinity for other people, liking other people — this is a very positive quality to have in your workplace.

A genuinely likable person who genuinely likes others is likely to get more done in a variety of ways:

  • They will try to do more with less. They’ll be inclined to look at the company as if it were theirs and try to be efficient with the company’s resources.
  • They will take the time to help fellow employees. The effort to help a co-worker isn’t something they feel compelled to do, they just think it’s the right thing to do.
  • This person usually takes criticism well. Supervisors enjoy working with this person.
  • The list goes on.

How can you tell how much a person truly likes people? Well, if you are not using our employee testing service, watch this 3 minute video and take our free test. The test can tell you many things about people and in particular it can tell you how much affinity and empathy a person has for others. And because you’re taking the test, you can see how accurate and revealing this test really is.

But what about the interview itself? Is there something you could do in the interview to help you assess your applicant’s affinity for others?

I think there is.

Give the applicant the following statement:

Describe for me what it means to like other people.

If the person very easily answers this question and gives an answer that makes total sense to you, that’s a good sign.

If the person stumbles a bit or hesitates and has to think it over, well, not a great sign.

People who go through life liking other people understand what that quality is and can easily communicate about it.

In the humble opinion of the author of this hiring tip, the more you can locate future employees that easily and freely like others, the better.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Do They Define Success?

Successful Employee

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With different ways of defining success, let’s look at a few of the obvious ones:

1) When you achieve what you want or intend.

2) When someone achieves a high position in their job, on a course, in a sport, in society etc.

3) When a person or business makes a lot of money.

Finding out how your applicant defines success is likely to give you some good insights into their personality and into their drive.

But let’s break this down a bit. Here are some questions you could ask:

1) How do you define success for yourself in the business world?

2) How would you define success for yourself with our company, say in the next year?

3) How about in the next five years?

As you well know, your applicant might not be considering your company for five years. But it can’t hurt to ask.

Success for some is having a job and a pay check. Enough money to pay the bills.

Success for some is making an adequate income AND having a great work environment. Friends, companions, caring about others and others caring about us.

Some equate success with status. A high position in a company, an impressive sounding title.

It’s going to be different from applicant to applicant, but if you can get in there and get some honest answers here, you’ll learn a great deal about your prospective staff.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Can They “Sift” Through Data?

employee thinking

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

An enormous amount of data and information can overwhelm the work environment.

How does one deal with this information overload?

Well, the first and most important skill is understanding “degrees of importance.”

Clearly some things are more important than others. From a management perspective and from an employee perspective.

Filing the paperwork on the last sale is important but as important as the next customer standing there waiting to pay?

If a customer needs help but it’s clearly not in one’s job description to assist this customer, do we hope someone else will attend to the customer? Or do we stop, find out what’s needed and do what we can to help?

If a co-worker is complaining about a mutual supervisor, do we join in or do we insist the co-worker get with the supervisor to sort it out?

Importances.

And degrees of importance.

The last example about encountering a complaining co-worker may not sound like a point of importances, but it is. How important is it to have a harmonious work environment? How important is it to resolve upsets or issues with the correct individual? Or is it not that important because workplace complaints are just a part of workplace life, so no big deal.

Importances.

Degrees of importance.

So how do we determine this with the applicant?

One suggest would be to make a list of different situations your staff run into that require them to “sift through” data in order to make decisions.

You could present some of these hypothetical situations to the applicant and ask how they would deal with them OR you could ask the applicant how they handled these types of situations in the past.

You can start out with situations with obvious ideal outcomes and then present some that are not so obvious.

How your applicant “sifts” through data to make decisions is a good thing to know before making your hiring decision.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Don’t Write Them Off So Quickly

Hiring interview

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Sometimes people rub us the wrong way in an interview.

And that’s enough for some of us to move on to the next candidate.

An exaggeration on the résumé may be grounds for some of us to pass on that candidate.

I’m not here to challenge your intuition or judgement.

If you don’t feel comfortable with someone and you want to keep looking, that’s 100% your prerogative. If you feel someone has fudged their résumé and this is simply unacceptable to you, again, you should do what you think is right.

(the word fudge means: to change facts to deceive people)

But I would ask you to consider this: sometimes what rubs us the wrong way is on our end of things and that individual could end up being a real asset for us.

And, when it comes to embellishing or exaggerating on the résumé, you probably know this is done fairly often. This does not make it right. Your integrity is important and making decisions one way or the other based on how honest an applicant is — well, this is also important.

Human beings are interesting creatures. We try to do the right thing and we sometimes find ourselves justifying the times we know we didn’t do the right thing.

“Well, I’ll just say on my résumé that I worked at Acme Enterprises a couple of months longer than I actually did. Then I can say it’s 3 years instead of 2 years and change. I think that’s okay, because if I’m hired in this new job, I’m going to do a great job here.”

Again, I’m not advising you to lower your standards.

If you find discrepancies, ask about them.

If someone rubs you the wrong way, bring that up directly and discuss it with the individual.

And of course, there are degrees in all things.

An outright lie on the résumé is different than an embellishment.

If a person rubs you the wrong way because they came into the interview wearing a tee shirt, torn jeans and slurs their words, well, that’s not so good.

I’m using some extremes here, but I’m sure you get the point. Humans aren’t perfect — none of us are — and sometimes it’s a good idea to keep that in mind when making hiring decisions.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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