When The Tables Are Turned

hiring interview

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The ideal hiring interview will include a time when the applicant can ask you questions.

I suggest giving a wide berth to the applicant here. Let him ask away.

Here are some questions you might get:

Pay questions: How much? Is there overtime pay? How soon before a raise? Can I do special projects to earn more?

Time questions: What’s the schedule? Am I required to put in extra time? Can I put in extra time? How about weekends?

Travel questions: Am I expected to travel? Where would I be going? How long would I be away from home?

Culture questions: How would you describe the company culture? Should I know anything in particular about fitting in here?

Other company questions: How long have you been in business? What are the company’s future plans? Is there some way I can find out about the financial health of the company?

And, of course, there are more.

The kind of questions you are asked will provide some interesting insights into your applicant.

And it’s probably a good idea that you consider the questions you could be asked and have a well thought out answer ready.

All in all, letting the applicant turn the tables is a helpful and revealing part of the hiring interview. For both parties.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Can They Prioritize?

Priorities

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I’m sure you know the meaning of prioritize, but I do like providing definitions.

“to put several things, problems, etc. in order of importance, so that you can deal with the most important ones first”

To be able to put things or problems in order of importance, one must know what their relative importances are.

Some employees will do what they are asked to do, what their manual says they should do and that’s that.

And that’s fine.

But that’s a baseline employee.

Bob has three tasks he needs to do. There’s only thirty minutes left in the work day. To do all three tasks is going to take an hour. What does he do?

He prioritizes.

He determines the order of importance of the three tasks and then takes care of them in that order.

What if the most important task will take up the entire thirty minutes and one of the other tasks is only a five minute task, but his supervisor urged him to get it done before he leaves?

What does Bob do?

Well, that’s part of prioritizing. He gets the five minute task done and then he pushes to get the thirty minute task done in twenty-five minutes, or he simply stays over five minutes to complete the task.

I realize this all sounds pretty simple, pretty straightforward. But we also know the ability to prioritize is not a strong suit for everyone.

The employee weak in this area will not do the five minute task and there likely will be some friction when he meets up with his supervisor the next day. Or this employee will do the five minute task, but leave the thirty minute task incomplete. This scenario may also see some friction the next day.

So, how can you determine if the person in front of you is good at prioritizing?

One way is to include this area of questioning when you speak to the applicant’s previous supervisors.

Another way is to compile a list of three, four of five tasks for the job in question and then ask the applicant to weigh them in order of importance.

You could have several of these lists put together.

It should not take a long time for the applicant to go through the tasks and give them an order of importance. If it does take awhile, not a great sign.

And your analysis of his sequence of importances will also be revealing.

An ability to prioritize is worth pursuing. Things will run smoother and be more productive.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Generous Is She?

generous employee

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Let’s look at two definitions of the word generous:

“Demonstrating a willingness to give more of oneself than is normally necessary or expected”

“Sympathetic in the way you deal with people; tending to see the good qualities in someone”

Two very interesting definitions.

The generous employee we’re considering here is not the employee who is willing to give away company resources. We’re not talking about Bob, the office manager, grabbing $50 from the cash drawer to help Alice with baby supplies.

We’re talking about a person who is generous with their own resources of time, money and effort.

How can we determine how generous someone is?

You could go about it this way:

“Allen, give me three examples of how you were generous at previous jobs.”

Observe how easily it is for Allen to come up with examples. If he comes up with them very easily, that’s a good sign. If it takes a bit of time, a bit of hemming and hawing, not the greatest sign.

Here’s another interesting approach:

“Allen, give me an instance at an earlier job where you wanted to be generous, but chose not to be.”

If you get a clear instance of this, find out why Allen decided not to be generous.

You’ll likely come up with your own methods of discovering how generous your applicant is.

I recommend doing so.

Generosity is a trait that can increase productivity and improve how smoothly things run.

Look for it when you can.

Encourage and reward it when you see it.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Fearless Are They?

Fearless

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Fearless.

That’s an interesting quality.

We’d probably want a soldier to be fearless, or at least as close to fearless as possible.

If an entrepreneur is embarking on a new activity, being fearless has its advantages there, right?

But, for our everyday applicants, is fearless a quality we’re interested in?

Let’s look at a definition of fearless : not afraid of anything. With synonyms of brave, courageous, bold, daring, adventurous.

I do like those synonyms!

If you’re looking for someone to just get the work done — and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that — then fearless isn’t a critical quality.

But if we’re looking for someone to make a breakthrough for us, in the areas of marketing or sales, for instance, then someone bold and daring may be exactly what we’re looking for.

What if we wanted a supervisor or office manager who never backed off from handling a situation in their area? Someone who always rolled up their sleeves, waded in and located what needed to be addressed and got it resolved? What if we wanted that kind of manager?

If so, then “fearless” would be an asset, right?

So how do we locate this quality in people? A simple, direct approach would be:

“Bob, tell me some things that you’re afraid of.”

Most of the time Bob will give you some things that he’s afraid of.

A fearless Bob, however, may say, “well, there really isn’t anything that scares me.”

The key to this answer is: Did Bob deliver it quickly and easily? Did he deliver it without the slightest flinch?

In a number of earlier tips, I’ve mentioned this ability that you want to be continuing to develop:

The ability to observe when your applicant is easily answering a question and there is no “flinch.”

I think you know what I mean by “flinch.” When someone answers a question with complete comfort, you are likely getting a candid answer.

Fearless.

If you’re hiring for a position that requires a bold and daring approach, zeroing in on “fearless” may get you just what you need.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


How Appreciative Are They?

Appreciative employee

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First, let’s look at two definitions of “appreciate” that apply to this tip:

To understand how good or useful someone or something is

Used to thank someone in a polite way or to say that you are grateful for something they have done

I’m thinking those two definitions blend in with each other. Someone who is appreciative understands how good or useful someone or something is and they communicate this in some way.

Ideally, you are looking for someone with a deep reservoir of appreciation, an appreciation of other people, the things other people do and even an appreciation for one’s environment.

We do enjoy the employee who sincerely thanks us for improving their work environment in some way.

“Bob, that new phone system you had installed is working really well. Thank you for doing that, Bob!”

“Thank you for creating the room where we can keep our lunch refrigerated and grab a snack during the day. Very helpful, Bob.”

“The Sunday picnic for the staff was off the charts. You really went out of your way to make that a great afternoon. My wife was blown away. Thank you, Bob.”

Now, if that appreciation extends to their fellow employees, that’s an even bigger plus.

Let’s find out if we’ve got that from your candidate.

“Alice, at your last job, tell me three things that you appreciated about the other employees you worked with.”

If Alice is the “appreciative sort” she should be able to tell you three things easily and quickly.

Going a bit further, you could ask, “Alice, how did you let these employees know that you appreciated them?”

When someone voices their appreciation of you and the things you do, you know how that makes you feel.

Well, the same is true of your employees. When someone who is openly appreciative of others, that has a very positive effect on the work place.

I’m not talking about an airy-fairy thing here. I’m not talking about someone who is nice to others because there’s something to be gained from being nice.

We know when we see genuine appreciation.

I rarely plug our employee tests in these tips, but I won’t be able to help myself here. Our personality profile measures ten key personality traits and one of them is appreciation. If you are not using our employee testing service, watch our two minute video and take the free test yourself.

In closing folks, there’s a huge difference between those who appreciate others and those who do not. It’s a fabulous trait to have on board.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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