The Really Bright Guy Who Ruins Your Company

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Well, it happens.

The candidate has all the skills. He’s top of his class. He aces all of the competency tests.

He can run circles around your best technician, your best salesperson, your most skilled programmer.

He’s just downright brilliant.

Except for one thing.

He’s a complete jerk.

You’ve managed to find out from several of his previous employers that he was rough on management and even rougher on his fellow employees. They wouldn’t come out and quite tell you this, but you sensed they hated the guy.

Now, I realize that may be a stretch, because many employers won’t necessarily give those kinds of reports on previous employees. But some will.

And maybe you checked around a bit, spoke to employees who worked with him and found out he was indeed the brightest star in the galaxy, but he was hell to be around.

And you’re thinking, “Hmm, maybe it’ll be different here.”

Or: “I’m a strong leader, I can manage this guy. His skills are so off the charts, we need him!”

Look, I’m not going to discount anybody’s ability to manage. I’ve seen really bad apples in the sports world go from Team A to Team B and the coach at Team B AND the other players on Team B were able to bring this bad apple around.

It happens.

But what happens more often is the bad apple, no matter how competent, goes from Team A to Team B to Team C and infects each and every one of those teams.

So, as always, it’s up to you. But if you’ve got a loaded gun to my head and you want my most honest advice here, hiring someone who refuses to get along with others is a huge risk. No matter how capable he is.

He may bring all kinds of great skills to your company while shredding the willingness of those around him. You may not be happy with the net effect.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


The Hiring Revolving Door

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This is going to be a self-promoting tip, but I believe a valuable one nonetheless.

Many of us are experiencing a revolving door when it comes to hiring new people. We read through the résumés, we conduct what we consider are reasonably thorough interviews and we may even check some references.

Then we hire Sally or Fred.

Sally quits in a few weeks and we have to let Fred go because he’s just not cutting it.

Both Sally and Fred seemed pretty good back when we were reading over their résumés and interviewing them. Now they don’t quite seem like the people we interviewed.

It happens.

For some of us, it happens a lot.

I have written and recorded in podcast form over 100 Hiring Tips. The vast majority of these tips focus on ways you can penetrate the “canned” or practiced responses and the polished résumé.

I spent this much time writing and recording these tips because of our company’s basic premise:

The more you know about someone BEFORE you hire them, the better your hiring decision will be.

So, with that in mind, here comes the self-promotion.

If you are not using our testing service, you really need to. If you were using it in the past and haven’t for your last few hires, by all means use us.

How much does it cost you to hire and train someone only to find yourself doing that a second and a third time for the very same position?

How much does that cost?

You’ve got the cost of the time spent hiring Person A.

You’ve got the cost of the time spent training Person A.

You’ve got the cost of the time spent grooving Person A into your workplace.

And here comes two hidden costs:

The cost of whatever Person A did that adversely affected your customers and prospective customers.

And the cost of whatever Person A did that lowered the production of those around Person A.

There are many costs to hiring someone who is gone in a month or so.

When you really look at the costs involved in not hiring the right people, well, frankly our service is dirt cheap compared to that.

We can and will help you hire better staff.

If you haven’t used our testing service yet, go to WhyTesting.com. There’s a short video there explaining our testing service and a link to take a free test. We want you to see how accurate the test is and, with it being your test, well, you’ll know.

If you have used us in the past, give us a call at 888-600-6095 and we’ll make sure your customized link is dusted off and working.

We want you bringing better and better people on board. We know what that can do for you.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Are You Hiring Mainly On Skill and Ability?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Today I read an interesting quote in a hiring book:

“Companies are notorious for hiring based on skill and ability, and firing based on fit.”

Certainly with regards to skill positions, I would agree with this. Most hiring decisions (for these skill positions) are based on ensuring you’ve got someone who has the right skill set and can do what is expected of them.

For just about every technical position, there are ways of determining your applicant knows what to do. You can even have him demonstrate his knowledge right in the interview or you could hire them conditionally for a day or a week where you’ll certainly get a good idea.

Even for the not-so-technical positions, you should be able to find out fairly quickly how skilled your applicant is.

If you’re hiring someone to do collections, hold the reception desk, or take over the Office Manager position, examining their experience and talking with previous employers should let you know that they can DO the job.

Then it comes down to: Do they fit in with your group?

Not to beat my own drum, but that’s where the many Hiring Tips before this can be of real assistance to you. And if you have not yet tried out our employee testing service, watch the three-minute video here.

By all means, make sure your applicant is sufficiently skilled to get the job done. But I strongly recommend you roll up your sleeves and ask the other questions (and there are many of them) that will help you decide if your candidate is well suited for your team.

Doing so will save you a ton of time and energy and it will be a blessing for your current hard-working staff!



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Hiring The Salesperson, Part One

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Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

I’ve been involved in sales in one way or another for most of my adult life. I’ve started several companies, and in all cases but one, I got those companies off the ground by wearing the sales hat.

I was able to hire salespeople along the way and my hat moved over to supervising their sales activities.

As any business owner knows, the lifeline of a company depends on people who can competently, successfully and ethically sell products and/or services.

Therefore it makes tremendously good sense to hire the right people for the sales position.

So let’s get down to it.

The first thing you could do is find out how prepared your candidate is for his interview with you. Ask him the following:

What can you tell me about my company’s product line?

This next statement is particularly true if your market is other companies but it’s also true if you providing a product or service to a general consumer:

The exceptional sales person will do as much research as possible on his prospective clients. The more he knows about the company or individual, the more effectively and efficiently he will be able to accomplish the sale.

So, what kind of research did this candidate do on your company? Did he do a quick perusal of your web site or did he really dig in for details on your product line? Did he happen to call one of your existing salespeople to find out how your product is marketed and sold?

If your candidate only did a superficial examination of your product line, that’s not a good sign. It’s not necessarily a deal-breaker, but research is a key element of the sales tool kit. If he only does a cursory job of it now when he’s trying to get hired, how diligent will he be when he’s selling your product line?

On the flip side, if your candidate did some serious research and can have an in-depth conversation with you about your product line, doesn’t that make you feel considerably more warm and fuzzy about his prospects.

There’s more to cover, surely, about hiring the salesperson, but this is a good start.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


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