How Appreciative Are They?

Appreciative employee

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here
1x
0:00
0:00

First, let’s look at two definitions of “appreciate” that apply to this tip:

To understand how good or useful someone or something is

Used to thank someone in a polite way or to say that you are grateful for something they have done

I’m thinking those two definitions blend in with each other. Someone who is appreciative understands how good or useful someone or something is and they communicate this in some way.

Ideally, you are looking for someone with a deep reservoir of appreciation, an appreciation of other people, the things other people do and even an appreciation for one’s environment.

We do enjoy the employee who sincerely thanks us for improving their work environment in some way.

“Bob, that new phone system you had installed is working really well. Thank you for doing that, Bob!”

“Thank you for creating the room where we can keep our lunch refrigerated and grab a snack during the day. Very helpful, Bob.”

“The Sunday picnic for the staff was off the charts. You really went out of your way to make that a great afternoon. My wife was blown away. Thank you, Bob.”

Now, if that appreciation extends to their fellow employees, that’s an even bigger plus.

Let’s find out if we’ve got that from your candidate.

“Alice, at your last job, tell me three things that you appreciated about the other employees you worked with.”

If Alice is the “appreciative sort” she should be able to tell you three things easily and quickly.

Going a bit further, you could ask, “Alice, how did you let these employees know that you appreciated them?”

When someone voices their appreciation of you and the things you do, you know how that makes you feel.

Well, the same is true of your employees. When someone who is openly appreciative of others, that has a very positive effect on the work place.

I’m not talking about an airy-fairy thing here. I’m not talking about someone who is nice to others because there’s something to be gained from being nice.

We know when we see genuine appreciation.

I rarely plug our employee tests in these tips, but I won’t be able to help myself here. Our personality profile measures ten key personality traits and one of them is appreciation. If you are not using our employee testing service, watch our two minute video and take the free test yourself.

In closing folks, there’s a huge difference between those who appreciate others and those who do not. It’s a fabulous trait to have on board.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Do We Owe You?

Benefits, Incentives, Bonuses, Extras, Perks and Advantages

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here
1x
0:00
0:00

I’m going to love this tip and I haven’t even written it yet!

For the most part, we’ve got two sides of the hiring equation, right? We’ve got the employer and we’ve got the person wanting to be employed.

There may be a middle man, e.g. a hiring agency, but at some point in time, you are going to be interviewing someone before you make any kind of long term hiring decision.

Back in the day — let’s say before the 80s or 90s — when you applied for a job, you were essentially told what the job was, what it paid, the hours, some idea of what was expected and, if that worked for you, then you were included for consideration.

Unless you were someone very special, you did not make demands or issue ultimatums to your prospective employer. If and when you did get hired, you were given a place to work, assigned tasks, maybe some training and off you went to carry out your duties.

After getting hired, you did not wait a week or two and then tell your employer that you need X, Y and Z so that you can perform to your full potential. AND that, if you didn’t get X, Y and Z, you might have to shop your talents elsewhere.

Back in the day, that just didn’t happen.

Now I realize I’m painting somewhat of a black and white picture here, but I’m doing it to make a point.

Let’s fast forward to present time.

The scenario I just presented is certainly not occurring wholesale in today’s hiring world, but some parts of this scenario are happening. And we can debate how much the balance of power has shifted in the hiring process and whether that’s good for business or not. But that’s not the purpose of this tip. This tip has a simple focus. We just want to find out from the applicant:

“As an employer, what do we owe you?”

When you ask this question, as we recommend with all questions in the hiring interview, pay close attention to how comfortable the applicant is in answering it. If he’s very comfortable, then it’s likely you’re getting a candid answer. If not, well, possibly not so candid.

Once your applicant has answered the question and you’ve written down what he said, it can’t hurt to ask it again:

“What else do we owe you?”

Now, I’m not recommending that you ask these questions — or any questions for that matter — with even a hint of a confrontational attitude. We just want to know what they feel the company owes them.

Their answers may fit 100% with what you’d like to provide every employee. That’s good to know.

And their answers may surprise or even shock you. That’s also good to know.

Either way, you’re likely to gain an insight into what it will be like having this person as part of your team.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Are Soft Skills Eroding?

Eroding Soft Skills

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here
1x
0:00
0:00

There are a number of definitions for “soft skills.”

One that I particularly like is:

“The personal attributes you need to work harmoniously with other people and succeed in the workplace.”

Another good one is:

“Desirable qualities for certain forms of employment that include common sense, the ability to deal with people, and a positive, flexible attitude.”

That last definition was interesting. “Desirable qualities for certain forms of employment…” — does that mean there are certain forms of employment where common sense, the ability to deal with people and a positive, flexible attitude are not important or desirable?

Perhaps that is the case, and if so, it brings us to the subject of this tip: “Are soft skills eroding?”

In my humble opinion, the most important soft skill is the ability to communicate…and communicate well.

That means being able to look at the person you’re talking to, giving them a clear statement of your ideas, listening exceptionally well and properly acknowledging the other person…and at the end of a communication, both parties fully understanding each other.

Kind of important, right?

Well, that soft skill may very well be eroding. Are you observing that in your interviews? In the performance of some of your new hires?

Is the skill of communication eroding because we are spending too much time looking at our phones, at our computer screens and not at each other?

Whatever the reason, YOU should not let your interest in soft skills wane. They are vital to the success of any business and a good number of business problems can be traced to employees deficient in them.

So, I’ll make a strong suggestion here. Regardless of who shows up to be interviewed, do not compromise on the soft skills. Hard skills can be taught…the soft ones, not so easily.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


What Does The Word Accountable Mean To Them?

Who Is Accountable?

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Accountable. Now that indeed is an interesting word.

I found two good definitions:

1) responsible for the effects of your actions and willing to explain them

2) responsible to someone or for some action; answerable

It almost seems the two words, responsible and accountable, are interchangeable. But not quite.

The main difference between responsibility and accountability is that responsibility can be shared while accountability cannot. Being accountable not only means being responsible for something but also ultimately being answerable for your actions.

So let’s ask your applicant what the word means.

“Frank, what is your definition of the word accountable?”

Now I’m going to give you a heavy dose of my opinion here. If Frank can easily communicate a fairly complete definition, this is a good sign that he demonstrates the quality.

If Frank fumbles around for an answer, then this could be a weak area for him.

The key here is that Frank can easily talk to you about accountability. It’s not foreign to him. He has familiarity with it.

So, instead of asking directly about being accountable, ask them to define the word. This may give you a better clue as to just how accountable they are.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Why Would You Hire Someone You Don’t Need?

shutterstock_71826508

Listen to the Hiring Tip Here

Now that’s an interesting question. Most of us have hired someone at one point or another that we ended up not needing.

And that’s understandable.

In this tip, however, let me make the question a bit more precise: Would you hire someone that you knew at the time of hiring that you didn’t need?

And if so, why would someone do this?

Well, one answer does come to mind. If the local economy is in rough shape and a good number of folks are out of work, you might just decide to lend a hand by hiring someone you don’t really need.

I’d say most of us have hired people we wanted to personally help with a job. We knew the person or maybe a friend or family member asked a favor.

But what if we didn’t know the person at all other than he or she was a member of the human race and a part of our local community?

If finances aren’t an issue, it might not be a bad idea to hire someone simply and only to help out the local area. This might be a means of paying something forward or simply doing a selfless act.

Unless you’re swimming in extra capital to spend, I realize this idea might seem a bit preposterous.

But there are surely things you could have this person do that would be helpful in your workplace. And if the word gets around that you hired someone you didn’t need in order to help out the local area, who knows what might happen next?

Maybe more local businesses will do the same.



To see how our employee test can help you bring better people on board watch this three minute video.



If you have ever interviewed someone and later discovered a "different" person is working for you, check out our new book How To Hire The Right People.


Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...